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The Hawaiian Life

     The Hawaiian Life for me is not only an association with a place on the map, but more importantly a state of mind. I would like to encapsulate my thoughts of what I feel the Hawaiian Life is. It will most certainly be up for debate, but I will let you instigate the conversation.

 

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Ukulii kapua, onaona ika mau'u

Ukulii kapua, onaona ika mau'u - Tiny is the flower yet it scents the grasses around it.

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Hepua noka wekiu

Hepua noka wekiu - A blossom on the top most branch. (praise of an outstanding person)

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Nana na moe

Nana na moe - Look to your dreams

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Tony and ifan

I ran across Tony and ifan a while back when I wanted to create a fanpage for Hawaiian Life. I quickly scanned through a couple of companies that provided the service I was looking for, but ifan caught my eye. Not know a whole lot about creating a fanpage or even wanting to spend the time learning. I decided to get in contact with ifan. My past experiences have leaded me to be rather cautious about getting too excited with the prospect of working with someone else on a project. I always have the tendency to think the person I’m hiring is going to be my panacea…

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HawaiianLifeFanPage

An easy way to get to our FaceBook fan page now is to simply remember HawaiianLifeFanPage come join us there too. The more people we can gather in the true spirit of Hawaii the more our lives will come alive and who knows where that will take us....

Mahalo nui loa

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Shrines, Temples & Heiau

Shrines, Temples & Heiau

 

 

Few ancient Hawaiian sacred sites have remained intact; many have been reduced to rubble or collections of stones. The broken stone walls or stone steps that we come across today do convey the mystery and reverence and harmony that the natural spirits held for the ancient Hawaiians.

 

Even the small upright stone at the side of the road with some offerings of leaves represented something of importance to the Hawaiians who lived their lives in harmony with Nature. By understanding how and why the temples were built, we may more fully appreciate the sacred stones.

 

Hawaiian Ancient Shrines

 

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The Words of the Wayfinder and The Sacred Word for Gratitude

Ancient Hawaiians believed in the sacred power of words and the sacred energy in all life. Out of the 40,000 words in the spoken language, a profusion of them describe the ancient Hawaiian’s close harmony with nature. In old Hawaii, man believed that his spiritual inheritance was to be guardian or kahu of the ‘aina or the living earth.

 

Thus, there are several words for all aspects of nature. There are words for every plant or animal species that are endemic to the islands, words to describe different kinds of rocks, minerals and the types of soil and the different types of lava.

 

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Morrnah Nalamaku Simeona, Founder of Modern Ho’oponopono

Morrnah Nalamaku Simeona the Founder of Modern Ho’oponopono

 

Restoring the light within ourselves and to the world at large was the mission of Morrnah Nalamaku Simeona (1913-1992).  A gifted Hawaiian healer, Morrnah presented the world with an updated version of the ancient Hawaiian practice of conflict resolution. Known as Ho’oponopono, and championed by self-help guru, Joe Vitale, Morrnah’s version of the Hawaiian tradition has been increasingly embraced by contemporary society which has been won over by its simplicity and elegance.

 

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Ku, God of Prosperity, God of War

The four primal Hawaiian gods wore several faces, but none more disparate than Ku, who was the god of prosperity, as well as the much-feared and terrible god of war and sorcery. He was also god of the deep forest, of the mountain, of dry and wet farming and the god of fishing. He also ruled the red flowering ohia lehua tree and his images were carved from that wood.

 

 

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The Wheel of Life

The wheel of life is filled with the spokes that represent all life, the animals, the plants, the sky, the water, the soil, the air, and the wind. As each one is destroyed the wheel starts to wobble until something replaces that spoke. If that spoke can’t be replaced the wheel continues to wobble and life becomes out of balance. The more spokes that are destroyed the worse the wheel wobbles until one day it self-destructs and all the spokes are gone. We are a spoke in the wheel of life just as everything else is. We are destroying other spokes for the sake of greed. If we don’t stop we will destroy life as we know it.  The wheel can be repaired but only when we become conscious and aware of our place in this life. I hope we have enough time left… I hope more people become aware... Aloha...

 

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Hawaii has a catch phrase of 'Hang Loose'.

"Hang Loose" is a term that means to relax, lighten up, take it easy. I like to imagine shaking all the stress from you body and becoming completly relaxed.

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Aloha

     Aloha is the most widely used, the most sacred and the most powerful word in the Hawaiian language. While most first-timers to Hawaii think it is a word used in greeting, meaning hello, goodbye or love but its true usage means volumes more. It is one of the two words that most represent the values that are cherished and treasured in the Hawaiian culture, the other being Mahalo.

 

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The Endemic Plant Species of Hawaii

     The Hawaiian Islands sit in about the middle of the Pacific Ocean, a long way from anywhere else in the world. In fact, Hawaii’s closest continental neighbor is almost 2,500 miles away. For any life to grow on the tops of these volcanic mountains, they have to have made an incredible journey just to arrive. Then there is the business of finding a way to survive.     The Hawaiian Islands are of course, volcanic islands. So there is no soil initially. Timing for our new plant is everything. They will need to arrive to the islands after there has been some erosion to help break up the lava a bit. So plant seeds that arrive on the island and fall in hot lava are obviously doomed.

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Picking the Perfect Pineapple

     If you have ever been to the Hawaiian Islands, then you have probably had a chance to eat some of the best pineapple in the world.  It is so good, that you can actually eat it till your teeth hurt, and your mouth is sore from the juice. What a truly great treat. 

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The Kingdom of Hawaii During the Kamehameha Dynasty

 

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Surfing 101

     If you really want to be able to get in touch with a piece of ancient Hawaii, then the sport of surfing is a good place to start.  It is an ancient Hawaiian traditional, that was the sport of the kings.  It could also be your sport.  If you want to start learning how to surf, we recommend that you get a good teacher. However, we did want to cover some of the basics with you.

 

     Let’s start by talking about surfboards.  You want to make sure you buy your first board very long.  The longer length will help you stay up easier.  Once you become more experienced, you can get yourself a shorter board.

 

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Test Newsletter for Hawaiian Life

Happy Holidays Everyone!,

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A History of the Pineapple

     There is probably no other fruit that says “Hawaiian” like the pineapple.  People eat tons of the yummy fruit every year, especially in the Hawaiian Islands.  The lucky people get to eat this fruit fresh in the islands.  The rest of us, though, get to enjoy it in canned form, or squeezed as a juice.  It is truly a wonderful food that helps you really get into the spirit of the islands.

     Interestingly enough, the pineapple is not a true native plant to the islands.  Like many other plants, it was brought to the Hawaiian Islands some time ago.  It is an adopted child of the islands.

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Visiting the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument

     Pearl Harbor is on of the top tourist destinations in Hawaii. The National Park Service designation is the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument. As you are making your plans to see Pearl Harbor, there are a few things to know.

     There are very few places in Hawaii with a dress code, but this is one of them. While you don’t need to dress up and aloha wear is appropriate, swim wear is not. This is a very special place and the sanctity of the site is maintained in part by not allowing swim wear or clothing of a profane or questionable nature. Military personnel are expected to be appropriately dressed. Bags, purses, fanny packs, diaper bags, etc is not allowed in the park area. There are lockers that you can use to store these items for a fee at the front of the visitors center. 

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